COSMOPOLITANSIM

Kerala, the state known as “God’s own country,” has now become the home to many different religious communities. The heterogeneous origins of Kerala’s large migrant population over the past centuries have resulted in a religious collage including Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Along the river banks and coasts these areas of worship stand for the basic core values of their respective religious sects, while also remodeling the status quo of traditional styles.

We visited the oldest mosque in Khozikhode, the Mishkal Masjid named after a rich Yemeni Merchant Nakhuda Mishkal. This mosque had the structure of a local temple, supported by wooden pillars of which was a symbol of Kerala’s ever growing greenery. Even though the mosque withstood damages in 1510 by the Portuguese, the Zamorin defended and repaired it. What is beautiful about this mosque is that anyone can enter its grounds, irrespective of caste or religion.

The Paravur Synagogue remained true to religious texts but had a dash of “Kerala-ness” to it. This was most evident in the Padippura (an arched gateway) and a staircase and space exclusively for women to gather and meet.

The Pallippuram church, also known as St. Mary's Church, was a symbol of community during invasions in the previous centuries. Today it still serves as a safe haven regardless of caste or religion.

In Kochi, we also met with some of the architects who are bringing Kerala's design into the 21st century. Vinu Daniel experiments with local earth and innovative integrations of the interior with the exterior. Manoj Madhu uses a variety of recycled materials and reinventions of classical Keralite floor plans.

ARCHITECTURE


കെരലൈറ്റ് ആർക്കിടെക്ചർ

 

Kerala, the state known as “God’s own country,” has now become the home to many different religious communities. The heterogeneous origins of Kerala’s large migrant population over the past centuries have resulted in a religious collage including Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Along the river banks and coasts these areas of worship stand for the basic core values of their respective religious sects, while also remodeling the status quo of traditional styles.

We visited the oldest mosque in Khozikhode, the Mishkal Masjid named after a rich Yemeni Merchant Nakhuda Mishkal. This mosque had the structure of a local temple, supported by wooden pillars of which was a symbol of Kerala’s ever growing greenery. Even though the mosque withstood damages in 1510 by the Portuguese, the Zamorin defended and repaired it. What is beautiful about this mosque is that anyone can enter its grounds, irrespective of caste or religion.

The Paravur Synagogue remained true to religious texts but had a dash of “Kerala-ness” to it. This was most evident in the Padippura (an arched gateway) and a staircase and space exclusively for women to gather and meet.

The Pallippuram church, also known as St. Mary's Church, was a symbol of community during invasions in the previous centuries. Today it still serves as a safe haven regardless of caste or religion.

In Kochi, we also met with some of the architects who are bringing Kerala's design into the 21st century. Vinu Daniel experiments with local earth and innovative integrations of the interior with the exterior. Manoj Madhu uses a variety of recycled materials and reinventions of classical Keralite floor plans.

COSMOPOLITANSIM